human


What’s in a Name? Using Terms From Definitions to Examine The Fundamental Foundation of Human Factors and Ergonomics Science.

Citation:
Dempsey, P.G., Wogalter, M.S., & Hancock, P.A. (2000). What’s in a name? Using terms from definitions to examine the fundamental foundation of Human Factors and Ergonomics science. Theoretical Issues in Ergonomic Science, 1(1), 3-10.

Abstract:
A collection of words extracted from definitions of human factors/ergonomics (HF/E) were analysed to examine the foundational basis of the field.


Minkowski Spaces as Models of Human-Machine Communication.

Citation:
Moray, N.P., & Hancock, P.A. (2009). Minkowski spaces as models of human-machine communication. Theoretical Issues in Ergonomic Science, 10(4), 315-334.

Abstract:
Acquisition and use of information about system state to initiate action is central to the safety and efficiency of human-machine operations.


Does Human Factors/Ergonomics Contribute to the Quality of Life?

Citation:
Hancock P.A., & Drury, C.G. (2011). Does Human Factors/Ergonomics contribute to the quality of life? Theoretical Issues in Ergonomic Science, 12, 1-11.

Abstract:
Our study explores the moral bases of human factors/ergonomics (HF/E). Since their inception, these co-evolving facets of the human enterprise have espoused a dedication to the quality of life.


What Future for Human-Machine Symbiosis?

Citation:
Hancock, P.A. (2007). What future for human-machine symbiosis? Ergonomia, 29(1), 17-18.

Abstract:
Humans are species like no other. They are self-symbiotic. By this I mean that primary control upon their own evolution is the technology that humans use to create the environments which they inhabit.


Human Performance and Ergonomics

Human Performance and Ergonomics brings together a comprehensive and modern account of how the context of performance is crucial to understanding behavior.


Developmental Changes in Human Duration Judgments: A Meta-Analytic Review.

Citation:
Block, R.A., Zakay, D., & Hancock, P.A. (1999). Developmental changes in human duration judgments: A meta-analytic review. Developmental Review, 19, 183-211.

Abstract:
We reviewed 20 experiments comparing duration judgments made by children versus adolescents and adults. All used a prospective paradigm, in which participants knew they would have to make duration judgments.


Human Aging and Duration Judgments: A Metaanalytic Review.

Citation:
Block, R.A., Zakay, D., & Hancock, P.A. (1998). Human aging and duration judgments: A meta-analytic review. Psychology and Aging, 13(4), 584-596.

Abstract:
Differences in duration judgements made by younger and older adults were reviewed. Previous research is unclear about whether such differences exist and, if so, how they may be explained.


Should Human Factors Prevent or Impede Access?

Citation:
Hancock, P.A. (1998). Should human factors prevent or impede access? Ergonomics in Design, 6(1), 4.

Excerpt:
     Probably very few people who read this article do not have access and have not used the World Wide Web. Beneath all the hyperbole and promotion exists a real, evolving system that already has had a substantial impact on the world.