Publications by Year


Human-Automation Interaction Research: Past, Present and Future

Citation:
Hancock, P. A., Jagacinski, R. J., Parasuraman, R., Wickens, C. D., Wilson, G. F., & Kaber, D. B. (2013). Human-Automation Interaction Research Past, Present, and Future. Ergonomics in Design: The Quarterly of Human Factors Applications, 21(2), 9-14.

Abstract:
Scientific research accesses the past to predict the future.


Can Technology Create Instant Experts?

Citation:
Hancock, G.M., & Hancock, P.A. (2010). Can technology create instant experts. The Ergonomist, 480, 4-5.

Abstract:
Here, we examine the potential for this rate and level of technologically-supported development of expertise. Our present question concerns how technology can facilitate expertise and how, in their turn, experts can act then to influence the development of human machine symbiosis.


In Search of Vigillance: The Problem of Iatrogenically Created Psychological Phenomena

Citation:
Hancock, P. A. (2013). In search of vigilance: The problem of iatrogenically created psychological phenomena. American Psychologist, 68(2), 97-109. doi:10.1037/a0030214

Abstract:
To what extent are identified psychological processes created in laboratories? The present work addresses this issue with reference to one particular realm of behavior: vigilance.


Ergaianomics: The Moral Obligation and Global Application of Our Science

Citation:
Hancock, P.A. (2012). Ergaianomics: The moral obligation and global application of our science. The Ergonomist, 503, 12-14.

Abstract:
The growing holistic focus of HF/E leads inevitably to a consideration of the ‘system of all systems’, the Earth. Our part in the incipient destruction of its civilization- carrying capacity is antithetical to the stated goals and aspirations of our science.


On The Left Hand of Time

Citation:
Hancock, P.A. (2011). On the left hand of time. American Journal of Psychology, 124(2), 177-188.

Abstract:
The present experiment examined the effects of sex and handedness on the perception of brief intervals up to 20 s in duration. In order to obtain participants with sufficiently high scores on a scale of handedness, we screened 1,276 people; the process yielded 16 men and 16 women eligible for testing.


The Key to a Quiet Life… or Death?

Citation:
Hancock, P.A. (2011). The key to a quiet life .. or death? The Ergonomist, 487, 4-5.

Abstract:
For most of the history of the modern automobile, the start function has been initiated by turning an ignition key which is typically carried on a keychain holding a bunch of keys that unlock many of the portals in our lives.


Cross-modal Congruency Benefits for Combined Tactile and Visual Signalling

Citation:
Merlo, J.L., Duley, A.R., & Hancock, P.A. (2010). Cross-modal congruency benefits for combined tactile and visual signalling. American Journal of Psychology, 123(4), 413-424.

Abstract:
This series of experiments tested the assimilation and efficacy of tactile messages that were created based on five common military arm and hand signals.