1991-2000


Pilot Performance and Preference for Cycles of Automation in Adaptive Function Allocation

Citation:
Scallen, S. F., Duley, J. A., & Hancock, P. A. (1994). Pilot performance and preference for cycles of automation in adaptive function allocation. Human performance in automated systems: Current research and trends, 154-160.

Abstract:
The present experiment examined pilot response to short duration cycles of automation in an adaptive task allocation context.


Sex Differences in Duration Judgments: A Metaanalytic Review

Citation:
Block, R.A., Hancock, P.A., & Zakay, D. (2000). Sex differences in duration judgments: A meta-analytic review. Memory & Cognition, 28(8), 1333-1346.

Abstract:
We quantitatively reviewed human sex differences in the magnitude and variability of duration judgments. Data from 4,794 females and 4,688 males yielded 87 effect size estimates of magnitude and 28 of variability.


What’s in a Name? Using Terms From Definitions to Examine The Fundamental Foundation of Human Factors and Ergonomics Science.

Citation:
Dempsey, P.G., Wogalter, M.S., & Hancock, P.A. (2000). What’s in a name? Using terms from definitions to examine the fundamental foundation of Human Factors and Ergonomics science. Theoretical Issues in Ergonomic Science, 1(1), 3-10.

Abstract:
A collection of words extracted from definitions of human factors/ergonomics (HF/E) were analysed to examine the foundational basis of the field.


A Fat Man Chasing Seagulls

Citation:
Hancock, P.A. (2000). A fat man chasing seagulls. Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Bulletin. (Presidential Column), 43(6), 2.

Excerpt:
     This article has one purpose – to get you to think about your local HFES chapter and whether you ought to be more involved in its activities.


Is Truth Soluble in Politics

Citation:
Hancock, P.A. (2000). Is truth soluble in politics. Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Bulletin, (Presidential Column). 43(4), 1-4.
(Reprinted in the Ergonomist, 364). (Presidential Column).

Excerpt:
One of the leading thinkers of the nineteenth century opined that the true job of the philosopher was not to study the world but to change it.


Can Technology Cure Stupidity

Citation:
Hancock, P.A. (2000). Can technology cure stupidity? Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Bulletin, 43(1), 1-4.

Excerpt:
     My title and theme for the present column comes from a provocative question i was asked recently – can technology cure stupidity?


On Monday, I Am an Optimist

Citation:
Hancock, P.A. (1999). On Monday, I am an optimist. Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Bulletin, 42(11), 1-2. (Presidential Column).

Excerpt:
On Monday, I am an optimist. I come to work fired by the hope an expectation of doing something substantive and useful.


Reply to Comments on ‘The Effects of In-Vehicle Distraction on Driver Response During a Crucial Driving Maneuver'

Citation:
Hancock, P.A., & Ranney, T. (1999). Reply to comments on ‘The effects of in-vehicle distraction on driver response during a crucial driving maneuver. Transportation Human Factors, 1, 313-316.

Abstract:
In the commentary of our work (Hancock, Simmons, Hashemi, Howarth, & Ranney, 1999), Tijerina (1999) exhibits a characteristic acumen though his identification of the two most controversial aspects of our argument, and it is to the these observations we wish briefly to respond.


The Driving Question

Citation:
Hancock, P.A., & Scallen, S.F. (1999). The driving question. Transportation Human Factors, 1(1), 47-55.

Abstract:
Goodman, Tijerina, Bents, and Wierwille (1999) present an excellent analysis regarding the safety of cellular telephones while driving and raise many important issues for current operation and future acceptance.